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Heron AM-10 - History

Heron AM-10 - History


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Heron I

(AM-10: dp. 840; 1. 187'10"; b. 35'G"; dr. 9'9" - s. 14 k.;
cpl. 78; a. 2 3"; cl. Laping)

Heron (AM-10) was launched 18 May 1918 by the Standard Shipbuilding Co.; sponsored by Miss Astrid Rehnquist, daughter of the mine sweep's prospective commanding officer; and commissioned 30 October 1918 Lt. K. Rehnquist in command.

Departing Boston 17 November 1918, Heron performed experimental mine sweeping work until 8 March 1919, when she returned to Boston to be fitted out for foreign duty. She departed Provincetown and sailed for Kirkwall, Orkney Islands to participate in mine sweeping in the North Sea. She remained in the area for 7 months helping to remove the countless mines laid there during World War I

Returning to Hampton Roads 1 November, she proceeded to New York and then to the West Coast. Heron reached San Diego 27 January 1920 to report for duty with the Pacific Minesweeper Division. She sailed for Pearl Harbor to join the Asiatic Fleet. In early October Heron sailed for the Philippines with Avocet and Finch.

The mine sweeper served in the 4th Division mine detachment until she decommissioned at Cavite 6 April 1922.

Heron recommissioned 18 December 1924 and reported to the Aircraft Squadron, Asiatic Fleet for duty as a seaplane tender. She operated principally in Chinese and Philippine waters, performing such diverse tasks as patrol, survey, target-towing, and plane-tending in addition to tactical maneuvers. Heron was reclassified AVP-2 on 27 January 1936 and continued to play an important role in protecting American citizens and interests in the Far East.

When the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor thrust America into war 7 December 1941, Heron (Lt. Comdr. William L. Rabler) was stationed in Port Ciego, Philippines. After supporting General MacArthur's gallant defense of the Philippines, Heron retired to the Moluccas and set up a base at Ambon. Upon hearing that Peary (DD-226) had been bombed and was in need of help, she got underway 29 December with oil and spare parts intending to rendezvous with the stricken destroyer at Ternate.

Next morning, upon learning that Peary had left she headed back to Ambon. The following morning, 31 December, an enemy aircraft came in on a bombing run. Heron opened Fire with every gun on the ship, and apparently enough machine gun fire~bit the plane to discourage a bomb drop on the first run. The bomber came in twice more to aim bombs at the twisting and turning seaplane tender, but the agile ship always managed to dodge in time.

Heron then made a run for a rain squall to the southwest. Some 2 hours later the weather cleared, and a Japanese flying boat was sighted on the water on Heron's starboard beam. The aircraft took off and circled Heron for almost 4 hours. About 1430 two sections of three four-engine Japanese patrol planes were sighted.

Half an hour later, one of the sections broke off and came in on a horizontal bombing attack. Although this section made three bombing attacks, in each case the ship was maneuvered to avoid the bombs. The second section came in next on a bombing attack, and, on their first run, Heron drew first blood by hitting one of the planes with a 3-inch shell. The plane started smoking, dropped out of formation, and retired to the north. Heron was again able to out maneuver the bombs unleashed by the two remaining planes on a final pass.

About this time five twin-engine land-based bombers and three additional four engine patrol bombers were sighted. The five bombers made a pass over the ship but did not release any bombs until they had circled again. On the rerun they dropped a stick of bombs. One hit directly on the top of the mainmast, and three others hit just off the port bow. Pieces of shrapnel cut all the mainmast stays to the boat booms, injuring most of the gun crew there. The near misses off the port bow set the paint locker in the forward storeroom on fire, damaged the port 3 inch gun, killed one of the lookouts and injured all the gun crew on the port 3 inch gun and the gun crews on the port machine guns.

Next, three four-engine patrol planes made torpedo attacks: one plane on the starboard bow; one on the port bow; and the other on the port quarter. Heron maneuvered skillfullY. and all three torpedoes missed.

They then staffed the ship, doing considerable damage. However, the crew of one 3-inch gun shot down one of the planes as it came in to attack. Heron had approximately 28 casualties, or about 50 percent of the crew, as a result of the attack.

During that night the fires were extinguished, the forward hold was pumped out to bring the ship back to an even keel; and the 3-inch gun was repaired. When the ship arrived back at Ambon, she resumed tending seaplanes and continued this duty until she retire" to Australia at the end of February. For her valiant action during this period,. Heron received the Navy Unit Commendation.

The seaplane tender remained in and around Australia through early 1944 as an advance base tender. Heron,also conducted salvage operations and served as an aviation gasoline and fuel oil transport. Departing Australia 22 March 1944, she next participated in the landings in the Admiralty Islands during April and then continued her plane tending duties. Steaming to the Solomons 1 September, Hero~n served as tender for Patrol Squadron 101, which was engaged in search and rescue work as the Pacific campaign moved into high gear. When the Navy brought MacArthur back to the Philippines in the momentous Leyte campaign, Heron was there, reaching San Pedro Bay 21 November. In the thick of almost continuous enemy air attacks, Heron spent over a month in the Philippines tending seaplanes before returning to New Guinea for repairs.

Heron again returned to the Philippines in April 1945 to participate in the wrap-up of the war in that quarter, and remained there through the end of World War II. She decommissioned at Subic Bay, Philippines 12 February 1946 and was transferred to the State Department (Foreign Liquidation commission) in July 1947 for disposal.

Heron earned four battle stars for World War II service


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Couldn't be more pleased with our overall experience at the Heron House! I'm so glad we stayed here. Location was perfect! An easy walk to Duval Street, but far enough away to relax in peace and quiet. Everything was beautiful, the courtyard, the pool, the private porches, the rooms. all of it! We had two rooms, both were unique in their own way, and clean! Will definitely stay here again.

Loved it! My cab dropped me off at Heron House when I had booked at Heron House Court. The front desk was amazing and quickly changed my reservation and had me in a room in 5 minutes with no issues. The place is well maintained and very comfortable. So much so, I wish I had been able to move in and stay there. I did not stay long enough to enjoy the breakfast.

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What a cozy, comfortable quaint place within 10 minute walk of Duval St! It was nice to come back and take a mid afternoon nap before heading back out at night. Very comfortable bed.


Robert Heron

The Estes Park Aerial Tramway was designed and built by Robert Heron. Mr. Heron became involved with tramway during World War Two. The 10th Mountain Division contracted the engineering company Mr. Heron worked for to design a portable tramway for use in Italy and Germany. The task was assigned to Mr. Heron. A book entitled “The Tramway Builders”, by Philip A. Lunday and Charles M. Hampton gives the history about these tramways and the men who built them.

After the war Mr. Heron traveled to Europe to study the tramways and became more fascinated with their design and capabilities. Because of the steep terrain, many trams in Europe do not require any towers to support the wire ropes. The entire length is a free span between the bottom and the top stations. The Estes Park Aerial Tramway utilizes this design. A free span is fairly uncommon in the United States and this type of design affords a very smooth ride.

Mr. Heron also became one of the pioneering chair lift builders for the United States ski industry and built the first double chair lift in this country.

The Estes Park Aerial Tramway opened to the public in July, 1955. Since then it has safely carried more than 3 million people to the summit of Prospect Mountain.

The tramway is still owned and operated by the Heron family.


Heron AM-10 - History

Heron A long-necked, long-legged wading shore bird indigenous to Louisiana and the vast coastal marshlands.
(AM-10: dp. 950 l. 187'10" b. 35'6" dr. 9'10" s. 14 k. cpl. 78 a. 2 3" cl. Lapwing )

Heron (AM-10) was launched 18 May 1918 by the Standard Shipbuilding Co. sponsored by Miss Astrid Rundquist, daughter of the mine sweep's prospective commanding officer and commissioned 30 October 1918 Lt. K. Rundquist in command.

Departing Boston 17 November 1918, Heron performed experimental mine sweeping work until 8 March 1919, then she returned to Boston to be fitted out for foreign duty. She departed Provincetown and sailed for Kirkwall, Orkney Islands to participate in mine sweeping in the North Sea. She remained in the area for 7 months helping to remove the countless mines laid there during World War I.

Returning to Hampton Roads 1 November, she proceeded to New York and then to the West Coast. Heron reached San Diego 27 January 1920 to report for duty with the Pacific Minesweeper Division. She sailed for Pearl Harbor to join the Asiatic Fleet. In early October Heron sailed for the Philippines with Avocet and Finch. The mine sweeper served in the 4th Division mine detachment until she decommissioned at Cavite 6 April 1922.

Heron recommissioned 18 December 1924 and reported to the Aircraft Squadron, Asiatic Fleet for duty as a seaplane tender. She operated principally in Chinese and Philippine waters, performing such diverse tasks as patrol, survey, target-towing, and plane-tending in addition to tactical maneuvers. Heron was reclassifled AVP-2 on 27 January 1936 and continued to play an important role in protecting American citizens and interests in the Far East.

When the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor thrust America into war 7 December 1941, Heron (Lt. Comdr. William L. Rabler) was stationed in Port Ciego, Philippines. After supporting General MacArthur's gallant defense of the Philippines, Heron retired to the Moluccas and set up a base at Ambon. Upon hearing that Peary (DD-226) had been bombed and was in need of help, she got underway 29 December with oil and spare parts intending to rendezvous with the stricken destroyer at Ternate.

Next morning, upon learning that Peary had left she headed back to Ambon. The following morning, 31 December, an enemy aircraft came in on a bombing run. Heron opened fire with every gun on the ship, and apparently enough machine gun fire hit the plane to discourage a bomb drop on the first run. The bomber came in twice more to aim bombs at the twisting and turning seaplane tender, but the agile ship always managed to dodge in time.

Heron then made a run for a rain squall to the southwest. Some 2 hours later the weather cleared, and a Japanese flying boat was sighted on the water on Heron 's starboard beam. The aircraft took off and circled Heron for almost 4 hours. About 1430 two sections of three four-engine Japanese patrol planes were sighted.

Half an hour later, one of the sections broke off and came in on a horizontal bombing attack. Although this section made three bombing attacks, in each case the ship was maneuvered to avoid the bombs. The second section came in next on a bombing attack, and, on their first run, Heron drew first blood by hitting one of the planes with a 3-inch shell. The plane started smoking, dropped out of formation, and retired to the north. Heron was again able to out maneuver the bombs unleashed by the two remaining planes on a final pass.

About this time five twin-engine land-based bombers and three additional four engine patrol bombers were sighted. The five bombers made a pass over the ship but did not release any bombs until they had circled again. On the rerun they dropped a stick of bombs. One hit directly on the top of the mainmast, and three others hit just off the port bow. Pieces of shrapnel cut all the mainmast stays to the boat booms, injuring most of the gun crew there. The near misses off the port bow set the paint locker in the forward storeroom on fire, damaged the port 3 inch gun, killed one of the lookouts and injured all the gun crew on the port 3 inch gun and the gun crews on the port machine guns.

Next, three four-engine patrol planes made torpedo attacks: one plane on the starboard bow one on the port bow and the other on the port quarter. Heron maneuvered skillfully, and all three torpedoes missed.

They then strafed the ship, doing considerable damage. However, the crew of one 3-inch gun shot down one of the planes as it came in to attack. Heron had approximately 28 casualties, or about 50 percent of the crew, as a result of the attack.

During that night the fires were extinguished, the forward hold was pumped out to bring the ship back to an even keel and the 3-inch gun was repaired. When the ship arrived back at Ambon, she resumed tending seaplanes and continued this duty until she retired to Australia at the end of February. For her valiant action during this period, Heron received the Navy Unit Commendation.

The seaplane tender remained in and around Australia through early 1944 as an advance base tender. Heron , also conducted salvage operations and served as an aviation gasoline and fuel oil transport. Departing Australia 22 March 1944, she next participated in the landings in the Admiralty Islands during April and then continued her plane tending duties. Steaming to the Solomons 1 September, Heron served as tender for Patrol Squadron 101, which was engaged in search and rescue work as the Pacific campaign moved into high gear. When the Navy brought MacArthur back to the Philippines in the momentous Leyte campaign, Heron was there, reaching San Pedro Bay 21 November. In the thick of almost continuous enemy air attacks, Heron spent over a month in the Philippines tending seaplanes before returning to New Guinea for repairs.

Heron again returned to the Philippines in April 1945 to participate in the wrap-up of the war in that quarter, and remained there through the end of World War II. She decommissioned at Subic Bay, Philippines 12 February 1946 and was transferred to the State Department (Foreign Liquidation commission) in July 1947 for disposal.


8 Zeno of Citium

You may not be as familiar with him as most others on this list, but Zeno founded the school of Stoicism. Stoicism comes from the Greek &ldquostoa,&rdquo which is a roofed colonnade, especially that of the Poikile, which was a cloistered piazza on the north side of the Athenian marketplace in the 3rd Century BC. Stoicism is based on the idea that anything which causes us to suffer in life is actually an error in our judgment and that we should always have absolute control over our emotions. Rage, elation, and depression are all simple flaws in a person&rsquos reason, and thus, we are only emotionally weak when we allow ourselves to be. Put another way, the world is what we make of it.

Epicureanism is the usual school of thought considered the opposite of Stoicism, but today many people mistake one for the other or combine them. Epicureanism argues that displeasures exist in life and must be avoided to enter a state of perfect mental peace (ataraxia, in Greek). Stoicism argues that mental peace must be acquired out of your own will not to let anything upset you. Death is a necessity, so why feel depressed when someone dies? Depression doesn&rsquot help. It only hurts. Why get enraged over something? The rage will not result in anything good. And so, in controlling one&rsquos emotions, a state of mental peace is brought about. Of importance is to shun desire: you may strive for what you need, but only that and nothing more. What you want will lead to excess, and excess doesn&rsquot help but hurts. [3]


7 Robert Falcon Scott (maybe)


We live in a world that has almost been fully explored. There are few places that we can go where no one has gone before. At the beginning of the 20th century however there were still blank patches on maps and a mania developed for exploration. Robert Falcon Scott, known as Scott of the Antarctic, was a British hero for his adventures towards the South pole.

His first exploration of Antarctica saw his team reach further south than anyone had ever been. The second trip saw him attain his dream of reaching the south pole &ndash but with tragic consequences. When his team of five reached the pole they discovered that a rival team headed by Roald Amundsen had already beaten them there by five weeks. Scott&rsquos diary recorded the team&rsquos crushed feelings. &ldquoGreat God! This is an awful place.&rdquo

On the march back towards their ship one team member collapsed and died. Another, Captain Oates, felt he was slowing down the mission and so set off into the cold on his own to spare the others. He left with celebrated British understatement. &ldquoI am just going outside and may be some time.&rdquo

The rest of the team carried on but blizzards slowed their progress. Within 12 miles of a supply depot they could not carry on. It&rsquos not known who was the last survivor of their trek but whoever it was must have felt very alone. Scott&rsquos diary ends with a message to whoever found them. &ldquoLast entry. For God&rsquos sake look after our people.&rdquo [4]


Automata Invented by Heron of Alexandria

Heron of Alexandria. Diagram of an automaton, a Bacchus figure dispensing wine and milk in a small temple. The figure is connected by invisible pipes with hidden tanks containing wine and milk. Venice, Biblioteca Marciana, Gr. 516, fol. 202r. This 13th century codex is the earliest surviving text of Heron's Pneumatica.

The dates of the Greek mathematician and engineer Heron of Alexandria (Hero of Alexandria, Ἥ&rho&omega&nu ὁ Ἀ&lambda&epsilon&xi&alpha&nu&delta&rho&epsilonύ&sigmaf) are not known with certainty, but he must have worked between the first and third century CE. Boas cites evidence in Heron's treatise Dioptra that Heron referred to an eclipse of the moon that occurred on March 13, 63, which would place him definitely in the first century. In Heron's numerous surviving writings are designs for automata&mdashmachines operated by mechanical or pneumatic means. These included devices for temples to instill faith by deceiving believers with "magical acts of the gods," for theatrical spectacles, and machines like a statue that poured wine. Among his inventions were:

&diams A windwheel operating a pipe organ&mdashthe first instance of wind powering a machine.

&diams The first automatic vending machine. When a coin was introduced through a slot on the top of the machine, a set amount of holy water was dispensed. When the coin was deposited, it fell upon a pan attached to a lever. The lever opened up a valve which let some water flow out. The pan continued to tilt with the weight of the coin until the coin fell off, at which point a counter-weight would snap the lever back up and turn off the valve.

&diams Mechanisms for the Greek theater, including an entirely mechanical puppet play almost ten minutes in length, powered by a binary-like system of ropes, knots, and simple machines operated by a rotating cylindrical cogwheel. The sound of thunder was produced by the mechanically-timed dropping of metal balls onto a hidden drum.

More illustrated technical treatises by Heron survived than those of any other writer from the ancient world. His Pneumatica, which described a series of apparatus for natural magic or parlor magic, was definitely the most widely read of his works during the Middle Ages more than 100 manuscripts of it survived. However, the earliest surviving copy of this text, Codex Gr. 516 in the Bibliotheca Marciana in Venice, dates from about the thirteenth century&mdash a later date than one might expect. Conversely, the complete text of Heron's other widely known work, the Mechanica, survived through only a single Arabic translation made by Kosta ben Luka between 862 and 866 CE. This manuscript is preserved in Leiden University Library (cod. 51).

The first publication in print of any of Heron's works appeared as a paraphrase of the early pages of the Pneumatica in the encyclopedic De expetendis et fugiendis rebus of humanist Giorgio Valla published in Venice the year after Valla's death, in 1501. The first printed edition of the complete text of the Pneumatica was the Latin translation from the Greek by mathematician and humanist Federico Commandino published as Heronis Alexandrini spiritualium liber (1575). The second work of Heron to be published in print was the translation from the Greek into Italian of Heron's work on automata by Commandino's pupil, the scientist and writer Bernardino Baldi, De gli automati, ouero machine se mouenti, libri due, first issued from Venice in 1589. Heron's Mechanica, a textbook for architects, engineers, builders and contractors, concerned the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary for an architect. It's complete text was first published in print in French translation from the Arabic as Les méchaniques ou l'élévateur de Héron d'Alexandrie publiées spour la première foi sur la version Arabe de Qostà ibn Lûqà et traduites en Français par M. le Baron Carra de Vaux. (1893).

Marie Boas, "Hero's Pneumatica: A Study of its Transmission and Influence, Isis 40, no. 1 (1949) 38-48.

Kurt Weitzmann, "Greek Sources of Islamic Scientific Illustration," Studies in Classical and Byzantine Manuscript Illumination, ed. by Herbert Kessler, (1971) 20-25.


The Life of Heron of Alexandria

Very little is known about the life of Heron of Alexandria. There are many mentions of writers called Heron (or Hero), but it was a very common name in the Hellenistic world. Historians think that he was born in the great seat of learning, Alexandria, Egypt, at about 10 CE, and that he was an ethnic Greek, although a few historians believe that he was Babylonian or Mesopotamian.

Heron taught at the University of Alexandria where, judging by the contents of his books, he taught mathematics, physics, pneumatics and mechanics. In these fields, he made many excellent contributions and, along with Archimedes, explored the practical uses of mathematics and physics.

Heron wrote at least 13 books, covering a range of topics:

Geometry and Mathematics

  • Definitiones: A glossary of geometric terms
  • Geometria: A basic introduction to geometry
  • Geodesia: Only fragments of this work remain
  • Metrica: This is made up of three books showing how to calculate areas and volumes, as well as divide them. This book was lost for centuries, until rediscovered in 1894.
  • Stereometrica (Volumes I and II): These volumes provide examples of how to perform three-dimensional geometry for spheres, pyramids, cubes and other solids. It is based upon the second volume of the Metrica.
  • Mensurae: Contains descriptions of the various tools that can be used to make measurements, as laid out in the Metrica and Stereometrica.
  • Geoponicus: Only fragments of this work remain.

These books all covered mathematical theory, including formulae for calculating the area of shapes and the volumes of solids, and the books also contain good approximations of square roots and cube roots. It must be noted that historians are unclear whether these texts were the work of Heron or written by someone else. As with many Ancient Greek texts, often only available in Arabic or Latin, or gleaned from other secondary sources, it is difficult to ascertain the original authorship.

Whoever wrote these texts, they contain the first known references to a systematic geometric system with standard terminology and symbols. All of the geometrical texts concentrate largely on the practical uses of the formulae and the examples are related to solving real-world problems.

Surveying

  • On the Dioptra: This book contained extensive explanations about the practical and mathematical methods for land surveying. It also included information about the Dioptra, the forerunner of the modern theodolite, which allowed surveyors to calculate angles and heights with great precision. The text also described the odometer, used for calculating distances via the rotation of a wheel of known circumference.

Mechanics

  • Mechanics I and II: There is also a reference to a book called the Baraculus, but this is believed to be an alternate title for the same books. In these treatises, Heron discussed how to move heavy weights using gears and pulleys, and the text was written for architects, engineers and builders. This book is divided into three distinct parts, the first dealing with wheels, proportions, scales, equilibria, balance, centers of gravity and simple gears. The second explains the theories behind five powers: Winches, pulleys, screws, wedges, and levers. The third concentrates upon cranes and sledges.

Pneumatics

  • Pneumatica: in this book, Heron wrote about pressure, and included descriptions of machines such as the siphons, fountains, slot machines, a fire engine, his famous steam driven aeolipile, and a temple-door-opening machine. These all worked with the pressure of steam, air, or fluid.

Automatic Machines

  • Automatopoietca: This book is where Heron included his designs for automatic machines, many of which were programmable computers using gears and knotted ropes. It could be argued that they were the first robots using simple binary language.

War Machines

  • Belopoiica (On Engines of War): This included explanations and diagrams of various weapons of war, including a crossbow known as the Gastraphetes and various other artillery engines.

Optics

  • Catoptrica (On Reflecting Surfaces): This book looked at the properties of mirrors, although only fragments remain.

Other Books

  • Water Clocks: Four books, of which only tiny fragments remain
  • Euclid: A commentary on Euclid and the resolution of some of the outstanding problems with Euclidean methods

Nesting

Nest Placement

Great Blue Herons nest mainly in trees, but will also nest on the ground, on bushes, in mangroves, and on structures such as duck blinds, channel markers, or artificial nest platforms. Males arrive at the colony and settle on nest sites from there, they court passing females. Colonies can consist of 500 or more individual nests, with multiple nests per tree built 100 or more feet off the ground.

Nest Description

Male Great Blue Herons collect much of the nest material, gathering sticks from the ground and nearby shrubs and trees, and from unguarded and abandoned nests, and presenting them to the female. She weaves a platform and a saucer-shaped nest cup, lining it with pine needles, moss, reeds, dry grass, mangrove leaves, or small twigs. Nest building can take from 3 days up to 2 weeks the finished nest can range from a simple platform measuring 20 inches across to more elaborate structures used over multiple years, reaching 4 feet across and nearly 3.5 feet deep. Ground-nesting herons use vegetation such as salt grass to form the nest.

Nesting Facts

Clutch Size:2-6 eggs
Number of Broods:1-2 broods
Egg Length:2.4-3.0 in (6.1-7.6 cm)
Egg Width:1.8-2.0 in (4.5-5 cm)
Incubation Period:27-29 days
Nestling Period:49-81 days
Egg Description:Pale blue, fading slightly with age.
Condition at Hatching:Bluish eyes open, chick covered in pale gray down, able to vocalize.

Minesweeper USS Heron AM-10 Manila Bay December 2, 1937

Please check the high resolution scan closely for condition of the cover. Many of these covers were sent through the mails, have issues with toning and in short, show effects of handling and time. Defects that cannot not be seen will be noted within this . Read More

Item Specifics
Item Description

Please check the high resolution scan closely for condition of the cover. Many of these covers were sent through the mails, have issues with toning and in short, show effects of handling and time. Defects that cannot not be seen will be noted within this description area if there are any. If you have further questions feel please to send us a message through the Stanley Gibbons Marketplace.

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