News

Escalante AO-70 - History

Escalante AO-70 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Escalante

A river in Utah.

(AO-70: dp. 6,782, 1. 501'8", b. 68'; dr. 30'8"; s. 15 k.;
cpl. 244; a. 1 5", 4 3"; cl. Chiwawa)

Escalante (AO-70), formerly Shabone, was constructed for the Maritime Commission by the Bethlehem Sparrow's Point Shipyard, Inc., Sparrow's Point, Md., in 1942 and sponsored by Mrs. Walter E. Than. She was acquired by the Navy and commissioned on 30 January 1943, Lieutenant Commander C. L. Bolton, USNR, in command.

After a brief shakedown cruise in the Chesapeake Bay area, she transported a cargo of aviation gasoline from Houston to the Canal Zone. She was then assigned to duty with the Atlantic Fleet, with Task Forces 60 and 61. Between May 1943 and 30 October 1944 she made six trips to north Africa and two to United Kingdom ports where she fueled ships for the Normandy invasion.

Escalante returned to Norfolk Navy Yard for overhaul to fit her for duty in the Pacific. On 4 December 1944 she loaded fuel at Aruba, passed through the Panama Canal and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 26 December. She reported to Service Squadron 10 to operate mainly from Ulithi in refueling units of the 3d and 5th Fleets at sea and thereby taking part in the action against Luzon, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Japanese homeland. From 26 September 1945 until 20 October she fueled ships in Tokyo Bay and then set sail for San Fransisco, arriving on 31 October.

She was placed out of commission on 12 December 1945 and transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal

Escalante received four battle stars for World War II service.


Escalante History

The small town of Escalante was named after Silvestre Velez de Escalante, a Franciscan missionary and the first European explorer in the region. During his journey in 1776, usually referred to as the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition, Escalante and his companions passed by the Grand Canyon and were among the first white men to enter Utah.

Members of the Southern Utah militia, under the leadership of Captain James Andrus, passed through the Escalante area during the Black Hawk Indian War of the mid-1860s. They recorded finding wild potatoes growing in the area and named a valley just east of the Escalante Mountains “Potato Valley.” In 1872, a group of settlers from Panquitch investigated the area, meeting members of the John Westly Powell expedition. Powell’s group recommended any new community be named Escalante in honor of the explorer, even though the 1776 expedition never reached the remote valley. The community of Escalante was finally settled in 1875.


ESCALANTE

A lthough the Anglo-American settlement of Escalante began in the spring of 1875 by a group of men from Panguitch desiring to find a location with a milder climate, signs of inhabitation of the area reached back much farther with evidence of the Fremont and Anasazi cultures in the area.

In 1866, during the Black Hawk War, Captain James Andrus's cavalry pursued Indians through the area, naming it Potato Valley. A.H. Thompson, who was the chief map maker of John Wesley Powell's crew, traveled through the plateau regions on different trips naming the points and mapping the trail. On an excursion in 1875, Thompson's party met four Mormons from Panguitch planning to establish a settlement in the area. Thompson advised the pioneers to name it for Father Silvestre Velez de Escalante, who passed near the Escalante River on his expedition from Santa Fe to California in 1776.

Drawn by the mild climate and abundance of grazing land, the settlers raised cattle and sheep. Dairying, timber harvesting, and mining were also important to the economy of the settlement. Escalante remained an outpost on the Mormon frontier for many years and was the last community through which the famous Hole-in-the Rock expedition passed in 1879 on its epic six-month journey to the San Juan River in southeastern Utah.

Blessed with beautiful topography, fertile lands, and a relatively long growing season, Escalante has been called the "Land of the Sleeping Rainbow." The early pioneer settlers built more than fifty homes of native brick which stand as a legacy today. The town was laid out on the "Zion Plan," with four homes to the block and ten-acre farms surrounding it. Wide streets and neatly landscaped yards with corrals and barns are still characteristic of the town. Home industries, including gardening, home canning, livestock raising, quilting and making of handicrafts continue as a rich part of the community life.

Many current residents, as in the case in most Utah communities, trace their roots to a few hardy pioneers. Those frequently associated with Escalante are the families of Willard, Henry, and Thomas Heaps Hosiah Barker Earnest Griffin Jared Porter Don Carols Shirts Napoleon and Lorenzo Roundy Perry Liston William Henry Deuel Joseph Spencer William Alvey James McInelly Morgan Richards William Cottam and Andrew P. Schow, who served as Mormon bishop and leader of the community for thirty-five years.

During the 1930s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps set up under federal New Deal legislation brought new life to the community and improved roads to Posey Lake and Boulder. However, increased government management of public lands brought new and sometimes onerous restrictions to some whose livelihood was based on the land. World War II saw a migration to the industrialized cities, as local growth was limited to what the natural resources could sustain.

Hardy pioneers, closely knit by family and neighborhood relationships, build a strong, conservative community. Isolated from major highways and large cities, the people battled the elements to build irrigation systems, electrical and telephone services (which eventually became locally owned), service stations, a bank, an airport, and other facilities which have made Escalante an important oasis for the thousands of tourists who visit the area each year. Visitors come to hike the Escalante River, follow the historic Hole-in-the-Rock Trail, view ancient Indians structures and rock art, traverse the magnificent Burr Trail to Lake Powell, and drive the 120-mile-long "Scenic By-Way"-Highway 12-connecting Bryce Canyon National Park and Capitol Reef National Park, along which Escalante is located in the middle.

The community is still dependent on a multiple-use-of-resources system with tourism, livestock, and timber the mainstays of the local economy. The community remains predominately Mormon students attend the local elementary school, the junior high school, and the high school. Escalante reached its largest population in 1940 with 1,161 residents, but it has dropped to its lowest number, 638 inhabitants, by 1970. Since 1970 the population has gradually increased to 818 in 1990.

Disclaimer: Information on this site was converted from a hard cover book published by University of Utah Press in 1994.


Welcome to the Escalante Ranch

The Escalante Ranch is located in Northeastern Utah in the town of Jensen adjacent to Dinosaur National Monument. The ranch is surrounded by the Green River and breathtaking views in all directions. The Escalante ranch location provides an excellent environment for some of the richest soil for alfalfa and grain production, as well as offers hunting and wildlife viewing for a multitude of wildlife species.

Visitors to the Escalante Ranch area can enjoy all the ranch has to offer, as well as a variety of activities in the surrounding areas from white water rafting, hiking, and camping, to fishing in some of the world’s finest blue ribbon trout streams. Visitors can also enjoy some of the world’s best dinosaur fossils in Dinosaur National Monument. Viewing pictographs and petroglyphs from Native Americans and history about outlaws like Butch Cassidy and the Sun Dance Kid can also be taken in from a variety of locations.

The Escalante Ranch historically was named after the Escalante-Dominguez expedition that explored the area in 1776. The Franciscan missionaries Fray Francisco Antanasio Dominguez and Fray Silvestre Velez de Escalante, some of the earliest explorers, who were searching for an overland route between the older settlements of New Mexico to the new ones on the coast of California, actually camped and crossed the green river at the ranch location.

The Escalante Ranch is truly one of the most remarkable ranches located in one of the most amazing areas in the world.


They won't be able to see your review if you only submit your rating.

The image is an example of a ticket confirmation email that AMC sent you when you purchased your ticket. Your Ticket Confirmation # is located under the header in your email that reads "Your Ticket Reservation Details". Just below that it reads "Ticket Confirmation#:" followed by a 10-digit number. This 10-digit number is your confirmation number.

Your AMC Ticket Confirmation# can be found in your order confirmation email.


Ships similar to or like USS Escalante (AO-70)

The Chiwawa-class oilers were United States Navy T3 Tanker oilers of the T3-S-A1 design built during World War II at Bethlehem Sparrows Point Shipyard of Sparrows Point, Maryland. The class consisted of five ships, all of which survived the war. Wikipedia

Constructed for the United States Navy during World War II. The only U.S. Navy ship named for the Enoree River in South Carolina. Wikipedia

Acquired by the United States Navy for use during World War II. The third ship of the U.S. Navy named for the Housatonic River in Massachusetts and Connecticut. Wikipedia

Built for the United States Navy during World War II. Renamed and reclassified Minah , and in the 1950s reclassified first as AMCU-14 and later as MHC-14. Wikipedia

Built for the United States Navy during World War II. Originally ordered as HMS Brutus for the United Kingdom's Royal Navy under Lend-Lease, but was acquired and renamed by the United States Navy before construction began. Wikipedia

The lead ship of her class of oilers for the United States Navy during World War II. The second U.S. Navy ship named for the Chicopee River located in Massachusetts. Wikipedia

The Chicopee-class oilers were oilers operated by the United States Navy during World War II. There were two ships of the class, and both survived the war. Wikipedia

One of five -class fleet oilers (also known as a type T2 tanker) built during World War II for service in the United States Navy. She also service in the Cold War. Wikipedia

Built for the United States Navy during World War II. Renamed and renumbered to Chinquapin (YN-12) in October 1940 before construction began. Wikipedia

Built for the United States Navy during World War II. The only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name. Wikipedia

T3 acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served her country primarily in the Pacific Ocean Theater of Operations, and provided petroleum products where needed to combat ships. Wikipedia

Built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for 2nd Lieutenant Oliver Mitchell, a pilot who posthumously received the Silver Star for his attack on a Japanese destroyer during the Guadalcanal campaign. Wikipedia

Of the United States Navy during World War II. Laid down on 14 June 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract at Galveston, Texas, by the Todd-Galveston Dry Dock Co. launched on 10 January 1944 sponsored by Mrs. E. R. Cox converted for naval use by the Todd-Houston Shipbuilding Corp., and commissioned on 28 September 1944 at Galveston, Lt. Robert E. McAllister, USNR, in command. Wikipedia


Human History In Escalante

Although the Anglo-American settlement of Escalante began in the spring of 1875 by a group of men from Panguitch desiring to find a location with a milder climate, signs of inhabitation of the area reached back much farther with evidence of the Fremont and Anasazi cultures in the area.

In 1866, during the Black Hawk War, Captain James Andrus's cavalry pursued Indians through the area, naming it Potato Valley. A.H. Thompson, who was the chief map maker of John Wesley Powell's crew, traveled through the plateau regions on different trips naming the points and mapping the trail. On an excursion in 1875, Thompson's party met four Mormons from Panguitch planning to establish a settlement in the area. Thompson advised the pioneers to name it for Father Silvestre Velez de Escalante, who passed near the Escalante River on his expedition from Santa Fe to California in 1776.

Drawn by the mild climate and abundance of grazing land, the settlers raised cattle and sheep. Dairying, timber harvesting, and mining were also important to the economy of the settlement. Escalante remained an outpost on the Mormon frontier for many years and was the last community through which the famous Hole-in-the Rock expedition passed in 1879 on its epic six-month journey to the San Juan River in southeastern Utah.

Blessed with beautiful topography, fertile lands, and a relatively long growing season, Escalante has been called the "Land of the Sleeping Rainbow." The early pioneer settlers built more than fifty homes of native brick which stand as a legacy today. The town was laid out on the "Zion Plan," with four homes to the block and ten-acre farms surrounding it. Wide streets and neatly landscaped yards with corrals and barns are still characteristic of the town. Home industries, including gardening, home canning, livestock raising, quilting and making of handicrafts continue as a rich part of the community life.

Many current residents, as in the case in most Utah communities, trace their roots to a few hardy pioneers. Those frequently associated with Escalante are the families of Willard, Henry, and Thomas Heaps Hosiah Barker Earnest Griffin Jared Porter Don Carols Shirts Napoleon and Lorenzo Roundy Perry Liston William Henry Deuel Joseph Spencer William Alvey James McInelly Morgan Richards William Cottam and Andrew P. Schow, who served as Mormon bishop and leader of the community for thirty-five years.

During the 1930s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps set up under federal New Deal legislation brought new life to the community and improved roads to Posey Lake and Boulder. However, increased government management of public lands brought new and sometimes onerous restrictions to some whose livelihood was based on the land. World War II saw a migration to the industrialized cities, as local growth was limited to what the natural resources could sustain.

Hardy pioneers, closely knit by family and neighborhood relationships, build a strong, conservative community. Isolated from major highways and large cities, the people battled the elements to build irrigation systems, electrical and telephone services (which eventually became locally owned), service stations, a bank, an airport, and other facilities which have made Escalante an important oasis for the thousands of tourists who visit the area each year. Visitors come to hike the Escalante River, follow the historic Hole-in-the-Rock Trail, view ancient Indians structures and rock art, traverse the magnificent Burr Trail to Lake Powell, and drive the 120-mile-long "Scenic By-Way"-Highway 12-connecting Bryce Canyon National Park and Capitol Reef National Park, along which Escalante is located in the middle.

The community is still dependent on a multiple-use-of-resources system with tourism, livestock, and timber the mainstays of the local economy. The community remains predominately Mormon students attend the local elementary school, the junior high school, and the high school. Escalante reached its largest population in 1940 with 1,161 residents, but it has dropped to its lowest number, 638 inhabitants, by 1970. Since 1970 the population has gradually increased to 818 in 1990.
Marilyn Jackson


Did you like this page? Did you find it helpful? Please consider sharing.


Festival History

Everett Ruess Traveling Exhibit

In 1934, young poet-artist Everett Ruess left the small town of Escalante, Utah, to “follow . . . the sweeping way of the wind” into the nearby deserts and canyons. A few months later his burros were found grazing peacefully in a box canyon, but he would never be seen again.

The disappearance of Ruess created enduring myth and mystery. Although he was only 20 years old, Ruess’s writings about the area now known as Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument reveal a devout union between artist and place.

Known for his gregarious ways, Ruess befriended artists such as Maynard Dixon, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Dorthea Lange. Ruess left behind his own body of art—woodcuts, drawings, poetry, and other writings—inspired by the wilderness he traveled through.

Ruess also left indelible memories among the residents of small towns and Navajo communities he visited. Escalante, Utah, would be his last stop before his ethereal walk into a deep rock canyon called Davis Gulch, where he mysteriously disappeared.

“Working Arts Festival” inspired by Everett Ruess

To celebrate the life and work of this enigmatic artist – local business people, caring citizens and artists, with the help of top Ruess aficionados, have organized the Escalante Canyons Art Festival/Everett Ruess Days. The Non-Profit Organizations Envision Escalante and Escalante Canyons Group for Arts and Humanities and other supporters present this “Working Arts Festival” as a premiere art and literary gathering with the aim of welcoming people to the stunning landscapes surrounding this area of Utah and giving attendees an opportunity to learn some of its rich history. We invite Utah and the world to come and experience the intense beauty in and around the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Everett’s spirit of adventure touches a special creative desire in all of us as we seek to express, as he did, our response to the rugged landscape and mystery of the Escalante Canyons and Red Rock Country.


Dominguez-Escalante Expedition

First page of the journal kept by Fathers Dominguez and Velez de Escalante of their 1776-77 expedition through Utah.

Much better known than the Rivera expedition, the travels of Fathers Francisco Atanasio Dominguez and Silvestre Velez de Escalante have left the name of the latter on a number of Utah sites. Utahns did not honor Dominguez, the expedition’s leader, with site names until the bicentennial of their trek in 1976.

Both Dominguez and Escalante enjoyed the advantages of good connections. A native of Mexico, Dominguez received a commission from his Franciscan superiors as a canonical visitor in 1775 and proceeded to inspect the New Mexico missions, evaluate the lives of the frontier padres, and assess the value of the Santa Fe archives that Pueblo Indians had ravaged in the 1680 revolt. He called upon Escalante to assist him in his other task: the search for an overland route to the recently established settlement at Monterey.

By 1776, Escalante, who was born in Spain, had already lived in New Mexico for some time. Ministering to the needs of Christian Indians at Zuni, he also visited the Hopi villages where he found clans of people he called “wretched infidels” flaunting Christian custom by dancing naked and rejecting conversion.

Ordered to Santa Fe to discuss the detail of the Monterey expedition,

This Is the Place Monument, Father Escalante. Courtesy–Utah State Archives. Gray–Photographer. Digital Image © 2008 Utah State Historical Society.

Escalante met with Dominguez, and the two of them talked with Governor Don Pedro Fermin de Mendinueta. The three feared opening a route directly to the northwest since they believed that the Chirumas, a reputedly cannibalistic tribe, might thwart their progress. Since neither priest wanted to provide the Indians with a brown-garbed lunch, they decided to take a circuitous route through the lands of the relatively friendly Utes.

They planned to depart on July 4, 1776, but had to postpone when events intervened. A Comanche attack on La Cienaga led to Escalante’s assignment as chaplain of a punitive expedition. Following the expedition, Escalante had to go to Taos on business. While there, a severe pain in his side?probably the result of a recurrent kidney ailment?forced him to bed. The diseased kidneys eventually killed him at the age of thirty in 1780.

The two padres and the governor had second thoughts about the expedition when they learned that Fray Francisco Garces had already blazed a trail from Mission San Gabriel near present-day Pasadena, California, by way of the Gulf of California to the Hopi villages in early 1776. Garces wrote to Escalante about his route, and since the “Trails Priest” had, in effect, opened a path from the Pacific Coast to Santa Fe, the two padres considered abandoning their project.

A meeting with Fermin de Mendinueta, however, led to an agreement to make the expedition anyway. The Spanish still had only a vague idea of the lands of Utah, and the stories of settlements of Europeans and unconverted Indians continued to circulate. Even if they failed to reach Monterey, the three principals agreed that the two Franciscans could provide useful ecclesiastical and political information on the country to the north.

Escalante Expedition Marker

Leaving Santa Fe on July 29, the two friars took a party that eventually included twelve Spanish colonials and two Indians. They recruited eight Spaniards in New Mexico and El Paso and four in southwestern Colorado. They also induced two Timpanogots from Utah Valley, whom they found at a Ute village in western Colorado, to help guide them.

Five of the recruits proved most helpful. These included Bernado Miera y Pachecho, Don Juan Pedro Cisneros, Andres Muniz, and the two Timpanogots, Silvestre and Joaquin. Miera, a retired military engineer who lived in Santa Fe, drew an influential map of the region, recommended sites for presidos, and provided measurements of latitude for the party. Don Juan, alcalde (chief administrative officer) of Zuni, offered valuable judgments as the party progressed. Muniz, an interpreter fluent in the Ute language, had accompanied Rivera on a 1775 expedition to the Gunnison River. Silvestre, a leader in the Utah Valley settlement, guided the party as far as his home. Though only twelve, Joaquin helped guide the party through its entire journey, the only Utah native to do so.

Throughout August, they crossed familiar territory. Muniz had passed through the region before, and Spanish traders and colonists had bartered and boarded with the Utes in western Colorado as well. On September 12, the party crossed what would later become the Utah border near the present-day quarry in Dinosaur National Monument. By this time, they had ventured into lands unknown by the Spanish and placed their lives in the capable hands of Silvestre and the youthful Joaquin.

Having long since outflanked the dreaded Chirumas by their northward march through western Colorado, they pressed westward into Utah. Following Silvestre and Joaquin toward their homeland in Utah Valley, the party crossed the Green River and ascended the Duchesne and Strawberry Rivers. Passing from the Uinta Basin into the drainage of Diamond Fork, they descended to the Spanish Fork River. Nearing Utah Valley, they left the river bank to climb a high prominence near the present-day Spanish Oaks Golf Course from which they gained their first glimpse of the Timpanogots’ home.

Here, they found a terrestrial paradise inviting Spanish settlement. Abundant water, pasturage, croplands, game, fish, fowl, and friendly Timpanogots greeted them. They found ample timber and firewood in the surrounding mountains, and they found the Timpanogots, thriving on fishing, hunting, and gathering. Anticipating that the valley could hold a population as large as that currently living in New Mexico, they promised the Timpanogots, then the largest concentration of people in Utah, that they would return, possibly within a year.

In the meantime, leaving Silvestre in Utah Valley, they induced another Timpanogot, whom they named Jose Maria, to guide them, and they left with Joaquin, treading southwestward on a route approximately parallel to present-day Interstate 15. Throughout the journey, Miera kept himself busy estimating their latitude by shooting the north star with a quadrant. Miera’s observations generally reckoned their location farther north than they actually were. For instance, had Miera’s September 24 estimate of 40o 49′ in Utah Valley had been accurate, the party would actually have been somewhere near Sandy in the Salt Lake Valley.

With Miera’s observations, they believed that they had to travel in a southwesterly direction to reach Monterey, which lay at about 36o 30′ north latitude. Pressing on, they followed the route now marked by I-15 into Pahvant Valley, where they moved southwestward into the desert toward Pahvant Butte and the current Clear Lake Waterfowl Refuge. Continuing southwestward, they suffered a setback just north of present-day Milford. Frightened by a scuffle between Don Juan and his servant Simon Lucero and increasingly homesick as the party moved away from Utah Valley, Jose Maria deserted in the early morning of October 5. Later that same day, a heavy snowstorm imprisoned the party in camp. After the storm abated, they pressed on, sloshing through the snow and mud with great difficulty.

Recognizing that an early winter boded ill for their expedition, Dominguez and Escalante proposed to return to Santa Fe by way of the Havasupai and Hopi villages in northern Arizona. However, Miera and two others in the party dissented, so midway between Milford and Cedar City, the padres agreed to leave the expedition’s fate in God’s hands by casting lots. After God dictated a return to Santa Fe, the party faced the added problem of recrossing the Colorado River. Stymied by the rugged walls of the Grand Canyon, they eventually found a crossing somewhat north of the Arizona border on a trail now covered by Lake Powell’s Padre Bay. Crossing much farther east than they had anticipated, the party pressed on to Oraibi instead of first reaching Havasupai. Once again in familiar territory, they arrived in Santa Fe on January 2, 1777, after a journey of more than 1,700 miles.

The results of the Dominguez-Escalante expedition were virtually all unintended. In spite of the padres’ glowing description of Utah Valley, Utah remained on the northern fringes of the Spanish and Mexican Empires,

Escalante Expedition Marker Spanish Fork, Utah 1922

unsettled by these Hispanic peoples. After the missionaries had returned, however, traders benefited from the trails they and Rivera had discovered. The German geographer Alexander Von Humboldt later found the Dominguez-Escalante journal. Publishing references to it, Humboldt left out Dominguez’s name in the process, and he drew a map based on Miera’s.

Humboldt’s work came to the attention of American path marker John C. Fremont. He commented on the padres’ journal in his report of the 1843-44 expedition that took him to Utah. Fremont also named the Spanish Fork River in honor of the Hispanic explorers. From Fremont’s writings, the Mormons who read the report knew of the Spanish explorations.


What will I see?

This is a big place and there are many landscapes within the monument, from towering cliffs to sandstone slot canyons, mesas, and forested plateaus. Most people visit the region around the towns of Escalante and Boulder, where there are impressive sandstone walls, tree-lined riparian corridors, and enormous vistas. But one of my favorite regions of the monument lies in the south, where the majority of the impressive fossil discoveries have come from. With a high-clearance vehicle, visitors can access these rough dirt roads and experience the pinyon-covered mesas and ridgelines of this part of the monument. In good weather, driving the Skutumpah Road or the Cottonwood Road can give you a great sense of this land.

Although it’s not possible to visit most of the fossil sites in this part of the monument, the Bureau of Land Management Visitor Centers in the towns of Big Water and Escalante, Utah, offer paleontological displays and information that will introduce visitors to the geologic history of the area. There are also wonderful displays and information at the BLM Visitor Centers in Kanab and Cannonville. Near Escalante, travelers can access the 20 Mile Wash Dinosaur Trackway site and the Wolverine Petrified Forest. If you’re up for more of an adventure and you want to do a pretty big hike, you can visit the Flag Point dinosaur track site as part of a guided tour.

Download a printable visitor’s guide here (opens as a PDF).